2015 GSA Rocky Mountain Section Meeting - Geological Society of

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1 Volume 47, Number 6 | ISSN 0016-7592 2015 GSA Rocky Mountain Section Meeting 2123 May 2015, Casper, Wyoming, USA

2 Rocky Mountain Section Geological Society of America 67th Annual Meeting Casper, Wyoming, USA 2123 May 2015 Hosted by Casper College, Department of Earth Sciences With Wyoming Geological Association University of Wyoming, Department of Geology & Geophysics Rocky Mountain Section GSA Officers (20152016) Chair. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kate Zeigler Chair-Elect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Erin Campbell-Stone Vice Chair. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ranie M. Lynds Secretary-Treasurer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kevin H. Mahan Past Chair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Emmett Evanoff 2015 Meeting Committee Meeting Chair. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kent Sundell Technical Program Co-Chairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Beth Wisely, Melissa Connely Field Trip Chair. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Terry Logue Treasurer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nancy Doelger Logistics/Hotel/Casper College/Exhibits Chair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ann Dalton Sponsorship Chair. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Julia Lemaster Other Committee Members. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marron Bingle-Davis (WGA), Mike Bingle-Davis (WGA), Karl Osvald (BLM) Student Volunteer Co-Chairs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Terra Hess, Mark Hines 50% Total Recovered Fiber 10% Post-Consumer 14 2013 GSA Abstracts with Programs

3 General Information The Casper College Dept. of Earth and Environmental the Tate Museum website http://www.caspercollege.edu/tate/ Sciences, the Wyoming Geological Association (WGA), virtual_fieldtrips/GeoProject_web/index.html. and the University of Wyoming are excited to host the 67th Annual Rocky Mountain Section Meeting in Casper, Travel Directions Wyoming, USA. We have developed a technical program Casper International Airport is the largest airport in covering a broad scope of topics, including the fields of Wyoming and offers direct flights to and from major airline Cenozoic volcanism; structural geology; paleontology; paleo- hubs in Denver and Salt Lake City. Casper is a small city biology and sedimentology; geomorphology; geophysics and albeit rather spread out along the various highways and trails hydrology; applications in GIS; and mining. Our location at whose intersection created the town. Downtown Casper is at the base of Casper Mountain along the North Platte River the intersection of 2nd and Center Street, in the heart of the at the southern margin of the Powder River Basin provides a community. The Casper College campus is located 14 blocks world-class energy resource and geologic setting for our con- south of 2nd Street with its northern edge beginning at 15th ference and associated field trips. Street. The Best Western Ramkota Hotel and Conference The field trips for this meeting take advantage of being Center is located northwest of the intersection of Interstate in the center of the spectacular and diverse geology of 25 and Poplar Street about 1.5 miles from downtown Casper. Wyoming. In addition, the Tate Museum, on the Casper Parking at both the Best Western Ramkota Hotel and Casper College campus, is home to Dee the Mammoth, the larg- College is free and plentiful. est Columbian mammoth in the world, Lee Rex, the most Excellent city and campus maps and information (PDFs) complete Tyrannosaurus rex collected from Wyoming, and are available at http://visitcasper.com/media/docs/CVB_ a great variety of other fossils, minerals, and gemstones col- adventureGuide-WEB.pdf lected throughout Wyomings well-exposed geologically rich Registration is required for anyone attending the techni- landscapes. The museum offers other great exhibits, gifts and cal sessions, field trips, short courses, keynote presentation or programs for families as well. exhibits. On-site registration is in the front Lobby of the Best The meeting is hosted by the Department of Earth and Western Ramkota Hotel, as per the following schedule: Environmental Sciences at Casper College, but is being held primarily at the Best Western Ramkota Hotel in order to Wednesday, 20 May: 47 p.m. facilitate easy access to most conference events. A closing Thursday, 21 May: 7:30 a.m.7 p.m. luncheon and several workshops are scheduled at Casper Friday, 22 May: 7 a. m.4:30 p.m. College on Saturday, 23 May. A variety of spectacular geo- Saturday, 23 May: 711 a.m. logical, historical, and scenic areas are located near Casper that may be visited by foot, car and some of our shorter field Fees trips. The Platte River Trails walkway is accessible from Crossroads Park, located about 1 block north of the Best On-site registration fees are presented in the table below. Western Ramkota Hotel. It follows the river along some fos- Full Meeting One Day siliferous outcrops of the Cretaceous Cody Shale to the east. Professional member............................. US$230.........US$100 A map of the walkways in Casper can be found at http:// Professional member (70+).................. US$70...........US$60 www.platterivertrails.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/PRP- Professional non-member..................... US$240.........US$200 Trail-Map-03.24.14.pdf. The National Historic Trails Center, Student member................................... US$60...........US$40 located 0.8 miles north of the Best Western Ramkota Hotel, Student non-member............................ US$80...........US$65 represents the intersection of five pioneer trails during the K12 Teacher........................................ US$60...........US$30 early days of Casper. Historic Fort Caspar is 3 miles by car, Guest or spouse..................................... US$55...........US$55 but can also be reached by following the Platte River Trails walkway to the west. On the way you pass by the site of the former Amoco Refinery, which is now home to a challenging Cancellations, Changes, and Refunds golf course, scenic commercial office space, and the Wyoming All requests for additions, changes and cancellations must Oil & Gas Commission building. The Alcova Lake recre- have been made in writing to GSA Headquarters by 20 April ation area and geologic wonderland is located just 30 minutes 2015. There will be no refunds for cancellations received after southwest along U.S. Highway 220, providing an opportunity this date and no refunds for on-site registrations or Abstracts for a quick stop coming or going to the meeting; or join our with Programs. Preregistration refunds will be mailed from Geoscience Teachers field trip on 20 May for a guided tour. A GSA Headquarters after the meeting. virtual field trip of the Alcova Lake area is also available from 2015 GSA Rocky Mountain Section Meeting 15

4 Ramkota Hotel and Convention Center CONFERENCE ROOM NATRONA o Casper, Wyoming COAT CHECK o WYOMING THEATRE G AZ EB O CONFERENCE ROOMS 142 o o PATHFINDER BUSINESS ALCOVA FITNESS CENTER ROOM 16 2015 GSA Abstracts with Programs

5 Continuing Education Credits Geoscience Educators Field Trip: Alcova Reservoir, CEUs can be earned for attendance at technical ses- Fremont Canyon, and the Cottonwood Creek Dinosaur sions, workshops, and field trips. After the meeting, please Trail. This is an all-day event. Participants will meet at 8:30 contact Lindsey Henslee at GSA Headquarters ([email protected] a.m. and the bus will depart at 9 a.m. from Best Western geosociety.org, or +1-303-357-1006) for a meeting evaluation Ramkota Hotel. form. You will receive a CEU certificate after you properly Welcoming Icebreaker. 57 p.m., the Terrace and North complete and return the form. Central Ballrooms of the Best Western Ramkota Hotel. Meet and greet with drinks and hors doeuvres. Accommodations Thursday 21 May The Best Western Ramkota Hotel is just 10 minutes from Workshop: Uranium Exploration and Production in Casper International Airport and offers complimentary trans- Sandstone Environments. 8 a.m.noon, Wyoming Theater, portation to and from the airport. A block of rooms has been Best Western Ramkota Hotel. US$50; student rate: US$30. reserved at the Best Western Ramkota Hotel, 800 N. Poplar, Principal Organizer: Cal VanHolland, Chief Geologist Casper, WY 82601 USA. To make your reservation, call Ur-Energy, Casper, WY ([email protected]). +1-307-266-6000 and use code GEOLOG to ensure that This workshop will examine the nature of uranium deposits you are booked into the block for this meeting. in sandstone environments. Discussion will include: the his- tory of uranium exploration and production in the Rocky Weather Mountain region; basic nature and geochemistry of uranium Weather in Wyoming can be highly variable during May, deposits in sandstones; primary exploration methods; data ranging from warm and sunny to windy and snowy, both on evaluation, mapping and uranium resource estimation meth- Casper Mountain and across the plains. We highly recom- ods; and extraction by in-situ recovery (ISR). Focus of the mend that participants look at National Weather Service workshop will be on roll front type uranium deposits in the forecasts and then plan accordingly. Regardless of the fore- U.S. cast, however, a coat or fleece is always recommended for cool Geoscience Career WorkshopsStudents and Recent mornings and evenings in Casper. For those participating in Graduates Only pre- and post-meeting field trips, it is highly recommended Part 1: Career Planning and Informational that you be prepared for mixed weather conditions with warm Interviewing. 89 a.m., Pathfinder Conference Room. comfortable shoes, hat, coat, gloves and sunglasses. Hotel FREE. Organizer: Jennifer Nocerino, Geological Shuttle Buses and Free Casper College shuttle bus service will Society of America, [email protected] Your be provided from the Best Western Ramkota Hotel to any job-hunting process should begin with career plan- events at Casper College (workshops and Tate Luncheon on ning, not when you apply for jobs. This workshop will Saturday 23 May) and on Friday night to a variety of restau- help you begin this process and will introduce you rants throughout the city until 10 p.m. to informational interviewing. This section is highly recommended for freshman, sophomores and juniors. Special Events and Activities The earlier you start your career planning the better. Part 2: Geoscience Career Exploration. 910 a.m., Wednesday, 20 May Pathfinder Conference Room. FREE. Organizer: Photogrammetry Workshop: 3-D Digital Data Collection Jennifer Nocerino, Geological Society of America, in the Lab and Field. 8 a.m.5 p.m. Meet in lobby of Best [email protected] What do geologists in vari- Western Ramkota Hotel and travel to Tate Museum and pos- ous sectors earn? What do they do? What are the pros sibly Alcova Lake. US$60; student rate: US$35. and cons to working in academia, government, and Co-organizers: Brent Breithaupt, BLM ([email protected] industry? Workshop presenters, and when possible, blm.gov); Neffra Matthews, BLM ([email protected]). professionals in the field, will address these issues. Photogrammetry is a powerful and relatively inexpensive Roy J. Shlemon Mentor Program in Applied Geoscience. tool for the documentation of paleontological and geologi- Teton Room, Best Western Ramkota Hotel, from noon1:30. cal resources. The purpose of this workshop is to familiar- Students will have the opportunity to discuss career prospects ize participants with the methodology, applications, and and challenges with professional geoscientists from multiple products of photogrammetry as it relates to the geosciences. disciplines over a FREE lunch. Learn more at www.geosociety. Demonstrations using fossil trackways of pterosaurs and dino- org/mentors/shlemon.htm. Program is first-come, first-served. saurs at Alcova Lake and/or Tate Museum will highlight the PostersExhibitors & Drinks. 46 p.m., North/Central workshop. Be prepared for hiking, sun, rain, wind, and cool- Ballrooms. to-warm temperatures. Typical late May weather in Wyoming Keynote Reception. 56 p.m. with food and refresh- is pleasant, with highs in the 60s and 70s (F), but rare storm ments, Terrace and South Ballroom. events can deliver snow or cold rain. Keynote Speaker. 68 p.m. South Ballroom. Robert B. Smith, University of Utah. 2015 GSA Rocky Mountain Section Meeting 17

6 A CAREER OF YELLOWSTONE RESEARCH Students interested in applied hydrogeology or hydrology as a AND DISCOVERIES career will have the opportunity to network with profession- Abstract: als in these fields over a FREE lunch. Learn more at www. My earth science career began in 1956, before college, geosociety.org/mentors/mann.htm. Program is first-come, where I was a field assistant conducting studies of Yellowstone first-served. Lake. In our bathymetric data I noted undulating lake sedi- GSA-RMS Business Meeting. 3:304:30 p.m., Natrona ment structures that intrigued me first about Yellowstones Room. geologic origin. It was also there that I began traveling PostersExhibitors, Hors doeurves. 3:455:45 p.m., Yellowstones wilderness following the trails of Washburn, North/Central Ballrooms. Hayden, Jagger, etc. These experiences led me to an academic Night on the Town. 610 p.m. Casper College Vans career at Utah State University for my geology BS and MS. are providing free rides and pickups to and from various During my junior year the deadly 1959 M7.3 Hebgen Lake, eating establishments throughout Casper. Casper College MT earthquake occurred. I traveled there and observed the geology club students will be available to recommend estab- 6 m high fault scarp, heard astonishing accounts of this huge lishments and participate in this night on the town. Return earthquake but found relatives safe. Notably this earthquake to Best Western Ramkota Hotel rides must call drivers before turned me toward a geophysics career that was followed 10 p.m. Please note numerous excellent restaurants and by military service conducting geophysics-geodetic surveys downtown Casper are within easy walking distance of the around the world and serving as the U.S. Exchange Scientist Best Western Ramkota Hotel. to the British Antarctic Survey. I completed a geophysics Saturday, 23 May Ph.D. at the University of Utah in 1967, initiating my for- PostersExhibitors and Coffee. 8 a.m.noon, North/ mal Yellowstone studies including seismic, GPS, earthquake, Central Ballrooms. volcano, etc. investigations. In 1973 revisiting Yellowstone Luncheon at the Tate Museum at Casper College. Lakes South Arm, I observed a buried shoreline and deduced noon1:30 p.m. Casper College vans are available to shuttle that the lake had tilted southward in the not distant past. people up to and return from the Tate Museum. Shuttle This observation began my crustal deformation studies that service begins at 11:30 a.m. and ends at 5 p.m. when several revealed an astonishing ~1 m of caldera uplift in just 60 years workshops end. and the first account of magmatic fluid migration driving Workshop: Creating Google Tours for Geoscience Yellowstones deformation. My career was broadened with Education. 15 p.m., Casper College Gateway Building visiting appointments at Columbia University, Swiss Federal Room 210. US$40; student rate: US$25. Principal Organizer: Institute of Technology and Cambridge University. My 57 Heather Almquist, Univ. of Montana ([email protected] years of Yellowstone research has included very productive umontana.edu). Participants learn how to create Google collaboration with NPS, USGS, and university colleagues, Earth tours using Google Tour Builder as well as within supervision of 70 graduate students 30 of which did theses the Google Earth interface. Essentials of creating core tour on Yellowstone topics, publication of 110 papers alone on artifacts, including ground overlays, screen overlays, 3-D Yellowstone, giving hundreds of Yellowstone presentations geologic models, placemark balloons, and Web pages are around the world, recipient of numerous awards, and co- covered, along with the basic kml coding required. Some authoring a very popular Yellowstone geology book Windows computers are provided in the classroom, but participants Into The Earth. Importantly Yellowstone allowed me to bring are encouraged to bring their own laptop. Van transportation quantitative skills into it as a wondrous outdoor laboratory provided: pick up at Best Western Ramkota Hotel, 11:50 with still exciting discoveries nearly every year. In conclusion a.m., return at 5:15 p.m. I sincerely appreciate the support of my colleagues, students, Petroleum Well Site Geology Workshop. 15 p.m., Tate the public, and my family to understand that Yellowstone is Museum, Room 121. US$50; student rate: US$30. Principal indeed a living, breathing, shaking volcano. Organizer: Arnold Woods, Casper College ([email protected] Friday 22 May caspercollege.edu). This workshop is a practical overview of Geoscience Career WorkshopsStudents Only what a well site geologist does to help ensure that modern Part 3: Cover Letters, Resumes and CVs. 89a.m., expensive horizontal wells encounter the targeted subsurface Pathfinder Conference Room. FREE. Organizer: location and produce as much oil as possible. Working with Jennifer Nocerino, Geological Society of America, mud loggers and sample descriptions, combining various logs [email protected] How do you prepare a to form a single data file, and colorful descriptions of what life cover letter? Does your resume need a good edit? is like for a well site geologist are but a few of the topics dis- Whether you are currently in the job market or cussed. Attendees examine cuttings, prepare a well log, and not, learn how to prepare the best resume and/or interpret pay zones. Van transportation provided: pick up at Cirriculum Vitae possible. You will review numerous Best Western Ramkota Hotel 11:50 a.m., return at 5:15 p.m. resumes helping you to learn important resume dos and donts. Exhibits John Mann Mentors in Applied Hydrogeology Program. All exhibits are located in the Terrace and North/Central Teton Room, Best Western Ramkota Hotel, from 12-1:30. Ballrooms. 18 2015 GSA Abstracts with Programs

7 Hours: Session chairs are asked to strictly adhere to the technical Wednesday, 20 May: 57 p.m. program schedule and to limit speakers to their allotted time. Thursday, 21 May 8 a.m.6 p.m. If a speaker does not appear for an assigned time slot, ses- Friday, 22 May 8 a.m.5:45 p.m. sion chairs should call for a break or discussion period and Saturday, 23 May 8 a.m.noon begin the next presentation at its scheduled time; in no cir- cumstances should you jump ahead in the program schedule. Technical Program A student volunteer is assigned to each oral session. Session The meetings technical program centers on multiple ses- chairs are asked to meet with the assigned student volunteer sions covering topics that range from Yellowstones volcano- before the start of the session. The volunteers are there to tectonics to geoarchaeology. The technical program begins help the sessions run smoothly and to contact the AV coordi- at 1 p.m. on Thursday and ends at 6 p.m. On Friday, the nator in the event of technical problems. program begins at 8 a.m. and ends at 5:45 p.m. Saturday is morning only, from 8 a.m.noon. Poster Sessions All poster sessions are in the North/Central Ballrooms. Oral sessions Please check the program for the specific times and topics. Oral sessions have 20 minutes per presentation (17 Poster presenters have one 4 by 8 horizontal (landscape) minutes for the presentation, followed by 3 minutes for poster display surface. Numbers on these display surfaces cor- Q&A and discussion). Presentations must be prepared using respond to the poster booth numbers listed in the program. PowerPoint .pptx for 2013 or .ppt for older versions or The poster boards accept push pins, and some push pins are PDF formats. One laptop with Windows 7 (no Macs avail- furnished for each poster. able) with PowerPoint 2013, one LCD projector, one green laser pointer, and one screen is provided for all oral sessions. Special Technical Program In addition, each room is equipped with a lectern micro- Meeting Keynote Speaker and Reception, celebrating the phone, wireless microphone, wireless computer mouse and career and research of Dr. Robert B. Smith, Univ. of Utah, PowerPoint advancer, and a speaker timer. Speakers may not Thursday, 21 May. A reception with food and drinks starts use their own laptops for presentation. at 5 p.m. at the Terrace and South Ballroom. Dr. Robert B. Smiths Keynote Address (A Career Of Yellowstone Research Speaker Ready Room (Alcova Room) And Discoveries) is from 68 p.m. in the South Ballroom. All oral session presenters must visit the Speaker Ready Room before their scheduled presentation to ensure their Technical Program Sessions PowerPoint or PDF files are properly configured and oper- Discipline Sessions: ating, then load them on one of the laptops. Failure to do so may result in presentations being omitted from session Economic Geology, Geochemistry and Energy (posters) sequences. The Speaker Ready Room is open for program Hydrogeology and Geomorphology (oral). checking and speaker assistance as follows: Structural Geology, Tectonics and Tectonophysics (posters). Wednesday, 20 May noon7 p.m. Theme Sessions: Thursday, 21 May 8 a.m.8 p.m. T1. In Celebration of the Release of the WGA 2014 Friday, 22 May 7 a.m.8 p.m. Wyoming Stratigraphic Nomenclature Chart: Topics in Saturday, 23 May 7 a.m.10 a.m. Rocky Mountain Stratigraphy and Sedimentology (oral and posters). Each speaker must bring his or her PowerPoint presen- T2. Geomorphology and Surficial Processes (posters). tation in .pptx for 2013 power point or .ppt for older T3. Advancements and Issues in Petroleum Extraction versions on a USB compatible flash drive (thumb drive or Technologies (oral). memory stick) or a CD-ROM disk to the Speaker Ready T4. Mineralogy, Petrology and Mining (oral and posters). Room for checking and uploading to the appropriate session T7. Paleontology, Paleoclimate, Paleoecology, and folder according to the deadlines below: Evolution (oral and posters). T9. Mountain Building and Basin Response: New If your presentation is on: Upload your presentation Insights to the Bighorn Mountains and Associated Basins Thursday, 21 May, afternoon session before 10 a.m., Thursday, 21 May (oral). T10. Geoscience Education and Undergraduate Research Friday, 22 May, morning session before 8 p.m., Thursday, 21 May (oral and posters). Friday, 22 May, afternoon session before 10 a.m., Friday, 22 May T11. Shallow Geophysics and Wyomings Water Saturday, 23 May, morning session before 8 p.m., Friday, 22 May Resources (oral). T12. Applications for GIS and Geospatial Data in the Geosciences (posters). 2015 GSA Rocky Mountain Section Meeting 19

8 Symposium Sessions: their cyclic packaging. The second day will focus on newly S1. Yellowstone/Teton/Snake River Plain Volcano discovered lake marginal carbonate and fanglomerate facies Tectonic System: Honoring 55 Years of Distinguished and the tufa-travertine carbonate buildups contained within Research and the Legacy of Bob Smith (oral and posters). these facies. Finally, on the third day, the group will exam- S2. The Continental Triassic: Sedimentary and ine growth strata within the Wilkins Peak Member at Slate Paleobiologic Records throughout the Rocky Mountain Creek on the western edge of the GGRB, which record the Region (oral). growth and subsequent succession of deformation along the S4. Quaternary Geoarchaeology: Honoring the Work of leading edge of the Sevier fold and thrust belt. John Albanese (oral). 3. Yellowstone and Northwest Wyoming Volcano- Tectonic Field Trip. Sun.-Tues., 2426 May. Co-Field Field Trips trip Leaders: Kent Sundell, Casper College, [email protected] All field trips depart from the Best Western Ramkota caspercollege.edu; Bob Smith, Univ. of Utah, [email protected] Hotel Lobby. utah.edu; Jamie Farrell, Univ. of Utah, [email protected] utah.edu; Henry Heasler, Yellowstone National Park, Pre-meeting Field Trips [email protected]; Cheryl_Jaworowski, Yellowstone 2. Geoscience Educators Field Trip: Alcova Reservoir, National Park, [email protected] Fremont Canyon and the Cottonwood Creek Dinosaur US$500; Includes transportation in coach bus with Trail. Wed., 20 May. restroom, two nights lodging at double occupancy rate, all Leader: Terry Logue, Casper College, [email protected] lunches and four beverages per day, road log of trip, and all caspercollege.edu. National Park entrance fees. All breakfasts and dinners will US$40; includes field guide, bus and driver, water, snacks, be on your own. and box lunch. Departure: Check in at 6:30 a.m., 24 May, at the Best Departure: Check in at 8:30 a.m., 20 May, at the Best Western Ramkota Hotel in the lobby. Trip departs promptly Western Ramkota Hotel in the lobby to pick up road log. Trip at 7 a.m. departs promptly at 9 a.m. Description: A spectacular trip, reviewing classic Laramide Description: The Alcova Lake and Fremont Canyon areas structures, stratigraphy, volcanology, geomorphology, and along the North Platte River within an hour of Casper, tectonics while passing through the Casper Arch, Wind Wyoming have provided tens of thousands of students (K River Basin, Owl Creek Uplift, Wind River Canyon, Bighorn College) with their first geologic field trip. This region con- Basin, Cody Arch, Absaroka Mountains/Basin, Absaroka tains well exposed easy to recognize rock units with numerous Volcanics, Sunlight Basin, Heart Mountain Detachment, invertebrate and vertebrate fossils incorporated within them. Yellowstone Volcanics, northern Teton Range, Fish Creek Special sites include the Cottonwood Creek Dinosaur Trail, Basin, Washakie Range, Wind River Arch, Dubois Arch, and Crystal Hill, the Pterodactyl Track Site and several others. back across the Wind River Basin. While in Yellowstone, we The visits will include discussions of geologic content and will visit thermal features (Mammoth, Norris, West Thumb), how to manage students and resources in large outdoor groups. Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone, Yellowstone Lake, and Old Faithful while learning about the underlying magma, Post-meeting Field Trips earthquakes, faults, and folds actively changing the entire 1. Tectonics, Climate, and Paleogeomorphology in the Volcano-Tectonic System. Additionally on Monday, 26 May, Green River Formation. Sun.Tues., 2426 May. Field Trip we will tour Grand Teton National Park and discuss the rela- Co-leaders: Michael E. Smith, Northern Arizona University, tionships between volcanism in Yellowstone and tectonism [email protected]; Jennifer Scott, Mount Royal within the Teton Range. The first nights stay will be in Univ., [email protected] US$450. Hotels, transportation, Gardiner, MT, and the second nights stay will be at Jackson and lunches will be reserved and paid with registration funds. Lake Lodge near Moran, WY. Participants will be responsible for paying for breakfast and 4. Powder River Basin: From Outcrop to Oilfield. dinner each day. Cosponsored by Wyoming Geological Association and Enhanced Departure: Check in at 7:30 a.m., 24 May, at the Best Oil Recovery Institute. Sunday, 24 May. US $60; includes Western Ramkota Hotel in the lobby to pick up road log. transportation, lunch, dinner, road log. Field trip Co-leaders Trip departs at 8 a.m. Please bring only needed items for three Mike Bingle-Davis and Marron Bingle-Davis. field days. Departure: Check in at 6:30 a.m. at the Best Western Description: The Green River Formation is one of the Ramkota Hotel, in the lobby to pick up road log. Trip departs worlds foremost archives of lacustrine strata, and it has been at 7 a.m. the recent subject of numerous stratigraphic, geochronologic, Description: This field trip will examine outcrops of paleogeographic, tectonic, and cyclostratigraphic investiga- the Frontier and Niobrara Formations. We will also tour tions. Our three-day field trip will investigate the strata of the Osage Field and the horizontal and/or vertical drilling the Wilkins Peak Member. The first day will be a tour of its site(s) including examination of the Turner SS, Mowry SH, classic, beautifully exposed basin-center facies in Firehole and Muddy/Newcastle SS that outcrop across the field. We and Sage Creek Canyons, where participants will be able to will also visit LAK Reservoir and the adjacent Cretaceous observe oil shale, evaporites, and alluvial facies, and examine outcrops. 20 2015 GSA Abstracts with Programs

9 F I E L D G U I D E 3 3 CLASSIC CONCEPTS and NEW DIRECTIONS: Exploring 125 Years of GSA Discoveries in the Rocky Mountain Region Edited by Lon D. Abbott and Gregory S. Hancock The Rocky Mountain Region has been the subject of continuous, exhaustive scientific work since the first organized geologic trips to the area began in the 1860s. Despite almost 150 years of scrutiny, the regions magnificent geology continues to challenge, perplex, and astound modern geoscientists. It is a testing ground for geologists and for big geologic ideas. This volume, pre- pared for the 2013 GSA Annual Meeting in Denver, Colorado, serves both as a progress report on what we have learned over those years of study and a guide to forthcoming scientific questions about the region. The guides fourteen chapters, which span the regions 1.7-billion-year history, give a retrospective glimpse of early geologic ideas being forged, bring the lat- est mapping and analytical results from classic locations, and introduce techniques that will form the bedrock of our geologic understanding in the years to come. FLD033, 388 p., ISBN 9780813700335 original price $60.00 | now $20.00 P R E R I B SHOP ONLINE } http://rock.geosociety.org/store/ C 20 M E M E $ GSA SALES AND SERVICE P.O. Box 9140, Boulder, CO 80301-9140, USA +1.303.357.1000, option 3 toll-free 1.888.443.4472 fax +1.303.357.1071 S P E C I A L PA P E R 4 9 9 Neogene Deformation between Central Utah and the Mojave Desert Edited by R. Ernest Anderson, 2013 This book is a must-read for researchers interested in extensional tectonics in general and the Neogene tectonics of the Basin and Range in particular, be- cause it challenges, on the basis of more than 50 years of field studies, the existing paradigm of province-wide uniformly large extension and replaces it with a model integrating extension with extension-normal shorteningboth as primary strains. The first chapter takes the reader on two journeys south- westward from central Utah through the Lake Mead area: the first to empha- size the lack of uniformly distributed or integrated extension and the second to highlight left-lateral shear at 13 localities along the east margin of the Basin and Range that is kinematically compatible with right-lateral shear along the west margin. The compatibility provides a basis for understand- ing the extreme Neogene tectonics of the Lake Mead area. The second chapter summarizes multifaceted field evidence from the well-studied eastern Lake Mead area as a focused example of the need for a com- plete revision of the extensional paradigm. SPE499, 94 p., ISBN 9780813724997 | original list $50.00 | now $40.00 member price $28.00 SHOP ONLINE } http://rock.geosociety.org/store/ $ 28 GSA SALES AND SERVICE P.O. Box 9140, Boulder, CO 80301-9140, USA +1.303.357.1000, option 3 toll-free 1.888.443.4472 fax +1.303.357.1071 2015 GSA Rocky Mountain Section Meeting 21

10 Schedule of Events EVENT TIME LOCATION WEDNESDAY, MAY 20 Registration 47 p.m. Lobby Photogrammetry 8 a.m.5 p.m. Tate Museum Rm 121 Alcova Field Trip Departure 9 a.m. Lobby Speaker Ready Room noon7 p.m. Alcova Room Exhibitor Set-up 15 p.m. North/Central Ballroom Geology Club Information Booth Coat Check Icebreaker (Cash Bar/Snacks available) 57 p.m. Terrace & North/Central Ballroom THURSDAY, MAY 21 Registration 7 a.m.7 p.m. Lobby Uranium Workshop 8 a.m.noon Wyoming Theater Speaker Ready Room 8 a.m.8 p.m. Alcova Geology Club Information Booth Coat Check GSA Workshop 89 a.m. Teton Room GSA Workshop 910 a.m. Teton Room Exhibits 8 a.m.6 p.m. North/Central Ballroom Poster Set-up 8 a.m.4 p.m. North/Central Ballroom Poster Sessions 46 p.m. North/Central Ballroom Poster Take-down 68 p.m. North/Central Ballroom Roy Shelmon Mentor Lunch noon1 p.m. Teton Room John Albanese Symposium 14:35 p.m. South Ballroom Shallow Geophysics/Hydrogeology&Geomorphology 13:50 p.m. Wyoming Theater Afternoon Break (Coffee/Tea/Snacks available) 2:102:55 p.m. Terrace Keynote Reception (Cash Bar/Heavy Hors-doeuvre available) 56 p.m. Terrace & North/Central Ballroom Keynote Talk 68 p.m. South Ballroom FRIDAY, MAY 22 Registration 7 a.m.4:30 p.m. Lobby Speaker Ready Room 7 a.m.8 p.m. Alcova Geology Club Information Booth Coat Check Poster Set-up 7:30 a.m.3:30 p.m. North/Central Ballroom Poster Session 3:455:45 p.m. North/Central Ballroom Poster Take-down 67 p.m. North/Central Ballroom 22 2015 GSA Abstracts with Programs

11 EVENT TIME LOCATION GSA Workshop 89 a.m. Teton Room Exhibits 8 a.m.5:45 p.m. North/Central Ballroom Petroleum Extraction & Mountain Building Sessions 811:45 a.m. South Ballroom Yellowstone Symposium 8 a.m.noon Wyoming Theater Morning Break (Coffee/Tea/Snacks available) 9:5010:20 a.m. Terrace John Mann Mentor Lunch noon1 p.m. Teton Room Paleontology Session 13:45 p.m. South Ballroom Mineralogy, Petrology & Mining 14:05 p.m. Wyoming Theater Afternoon Break (Coffee/Tea/Snacks available) 2:252:40 p.m. Terrace GSA-RMS Business Meeting (Coffee/Tea available) 3:304:30 p.m. Natrona Social Hour (Cash Bar/Snacks available) 45:45 p.m. Terrace & North/Central Ballroom Night on the Town 610 p.m. SATURDAY, MAY 23 Registration 7:30 a.m.noon Lobby Speaker Ready Room 710 a.m. Alcova Geology Club Information Booth Coat Check Poster Set-up 78 a.m. North/Central Ballroom Poster Session 8 a.m.noon North/Central Ballroom Poster Take-down noon3 p.m. North/Central Ballroom Exhibits 8 a.m.noon North/Central Ballroom Exhibit Take-down noon5 p.m. North/Central Ballroom Continental Triassic Symposium 810:55 a.m. South Ballroom WGA Stratigraphy and Education Sessions 8.11:50 a.m. Wyoming Theater Morning Break (Coffee/Tea/Snacks available) 9:3010 a.m. Terrace Lunch noon1:30 p.m. Tate Museum Petroleum Well-Site Workshop 15 p.m. Tate Museum - Rm 121 Google Tours Workshop 15 p.m. Casper College - GW210 SUNDAY, MAY 24 Powder River Basin Field Trip 7 a.m.evening Lobby Yellowstone Field Trip 7 a.m.26 May Lobby Green River Basin Field Trip 8 a.m.26 May Lobby 2015 GSA Rocky Mountain Section Meeting 23

12 Publish Your Research as a GSA Book Looking for international exposure in a noteworthy book series? Interested in online ahead-of-print publication for accepted chapters? SPECIAL PAPERS are state-of-the-art treatments of rapidly evolving subjects; most symposium-based Publish your in-depth volumes fall into this category. geoscience research with MEMOIRS are likely to remain the authoritative GSA Books: reference on a subject for a number of years. www.geosociety.org/pubs REVIEWS IN ENGINEERING GEOLOGY are /bookguid.htm produced in cooperation with GSAs Environmental and Engineering Geology Division, which is responsible for the selection, review, and acceptance of manuscripts } Stringent peer review for this series. } Included in the Thomson Reuters Book Citation Index } Online First: Special Paper and Memoir } PROPOSE A BOOK YOU HAVE AUTHORED (not compiled): chapters available online ahead of print Include the table of contents, the background and } Included in the Web of Science and significance of the proposed book, and the abstract. contribute toward H-factors } Multiple formats: e-books and print } PROPOSE AN EDITED VOLUME: } Indexed in CrossRef, GeoRef, and abstract Include a list of chapter titles and authors with services affiliations, the background and significance of the proposed volume, and any available chapter abstracts. } Searchable through Google BooksTM PLUS: } Responsive editorial staff } ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: } Professional copyediting and layout www.geosociety.org/pubs/bookguid.htm, } Global marketing of your volume or e-mail [email protected] with specific questions about your project. } GSA BOOKS SCIENCE EDITORS Kent CondieNew Mexico Tech Richard A. (Skip) Davis Jr.Harte Research Institute, Texas A&M University When you publish your work with GSA Books, you can be assured of a high-quality publication and a hassle-free experience. www.gsapubs.org 24 2015 GSA Abstracts with Programs

13 Technical Sessions Meeting policy prohibits the use of cameras A no-smoking policy has been established by or sound-recording equipment at technical the Program Committee and will be followed in sessions and poster sessions. all meeting rooms for technical sessions. NOTICE In the interest of public information, the Geological Society of America provides a forum for the presentation of diverse opinions and positions. The opinions (views) expressed by speakers and exhibitors at these sessions are their own and do not necessarily represent the views or policies of the Geological Society of America. NOTE INDEX SYSTEM Numbers (2-4, 15-4) indicate session and order of presentation within that session. *denotes speaker THURSDAY, 21 MAY 2015 AFTERNOON 2-2 1:40 PM Francis, Julie*: CRM GEOARCHAEOLOGY AND JOHN ALBANESE ORAL TECHNICAL SESSIONS 2-3 2:00 PM Gilbert, Miles*: FOSSILS AND STRATIGRAPHY OF NATURAL TRAP CAVE, WYOMING: A RETROSPECTIVE SESSION NO. 1 2-4 2:20 PM Eckerle, William*: HOLOCENE ALLUVIAL GEOLOGY OF THE EAGLE TREE ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITE (48CO2920), Hydrogeology and Geomorphology CONVERSE COUNTY, WYOMING 2:25 PM, Best Western Ramkota Hotel, Wyoming Theater 2:40 PM Break Beth Wisely and Brandon McElroy, Presiding 2-5 2:55 PM Donohue, James A.*: JOHN ALBANESE AND THE 2:25 PM Introductory Remarks IDENTIFICATION OF EARLY HOLOCENE LANDSCAPES 1-1 2:30 PM Lachmar, Thomas E.*; McDonough, Hannah L.: SOURCES, AND PALEOINDIAN OCCUPATIONS ON ELM CREEK, FALL PATHWAYS AND FATE OF METALS IN GROUND AND RIVER COUNTY, SOUTH DAKOTA SURFACE WATERS AT THE ABANDONED RAMSHORN 2-6 3:15 PM Fosha, Michael*: SUMMIT SPRINGS, LICKING BISON AND MINE NEAR CHALLIS, IDAHO OTHER ADVENTURES WITH JOHN ALBANESE 1-2 2:50 PM Allen, Sarah M.*; Ranney, McKenzie M.; Murphy, Chid; Roberts, 2-7 3:35 PM Jones, Hillary A.*; Finley, Judson Byrd; Rittenour, Tammy; Sterling; Adhikari, Santosh; Panday, Suman; Emerman, Cannon, Kenneth P.: DEPOSITIONAL CIRCUMSTANCES OF StevenH.; Fellows, Steven A.: TESTING THE ACCELERATED THREE PALEOINDIAN SITES ALONG LIMA RESERVOIR, EROSION MODEL FOR ARSENIC CONTAMINATION MONTANA OF GROUNDWATER IN KATHMANDU VALLEY, NEPAL 2-8 3:55 PM Wilson, Michael C.*; Hill, Christopher L.; Rennie, Patrick J.; HIMALAYA Batten, David C.: ARCHAEOLOGICAL GEOLOGY OF THE 1-3 3:10 PM Alexander, Jason S.*; McElroy, Brandon: HOW DO SAND- SHEEP ROCK SPRING SITE, LATE PLEISTOCENE TO BEDDED RIVERS SCOUR? HOLOCENE, MISSOURI RIVER HEADWATERS REGION, 1-4 3:30 PM Evanoff, Emmett*: LATE EOCENE PALEOVALLEYS OF SOUTHWEST MONTANA THE NORTHERN LARAMIE MOUNTAINS AND EASTERN 2-9 4:15 PM McFaul, Michael*: GEOARCHAEOLOGICAL EVALUATIONS GRANITE MOUNTAINS, WYOMING OF GEOMORPHIC SURFACES LORETO, BAJA CALIFORNIA SUR, MEXICO SESSION NO. 2 S4. Quaternary Geoarchaeology: Honoring the Work of SESSION NO. 3 JohnAlbanese T11. Shallow Geophysics and Wyomings Water Resources 1:00 PM, Best Western Ramkota Hotel, South Ballroom 1:00 PM, Best Western Ramkota Hotel, Wyoming Theater Dana Pertermann and Kerry Lippincott, Presiding W. Steven Holbrook and Beth Wisely, Presiding 1:00 PM Introduction to a Legacy in Geoarchaeology, John 1:00 PM Introductory Remarks Albanese, by John Goss 3-1 1:10 PM Hein, Annette E.*; Parsekian, Andrew D.; Armstrong, RyanS.; 2-1 1:20 PM Frison, George*: GEOARCHAEOLOGY: AN INSEPARABLE Creighton, Andrea; Holbrook, W. Steven: MEASURING COMPONENT IN THE RECOVERY AND ANALYSIS OF GROUNDWATER IN THE SNOWY RANGE WITH BURIED ARCHAEOLGICAL DATA 2015 GSA Rocky Mountain Section Meeting 25

14 SESSION NO. 3 NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE AND AIRBORNE 5-2 9 Kenny, Ray*: STABLE ISOTOPES AND SPELEOTHEM ELECTROMAGNETIC MAPPING CHRONOLOGY FROM A HIGH ALPINE CAVE, SOUTHERN SAN 3-2 1:30 PM Brown, Brandon*; Sundell, Kent: SHALLOW GEOPHYSICS JUAN MOUNTAINS, CO: EVIDENCE FOR DEGLACIATION AS PROJECT WITHIN THE WASATCH FORMATION TO EARLY AS 13.5KA DETERMINE THE FEASIBILITY OF MINING URANIUM 5-3 10 Gillam, Mary L.*: IMPLICATIONS OF NEW DATES FOR SAN JUAN DEPOSITS BY IN SITU METHODS RIVER TERRACES NEAR BLUFF, UTAH 3-3 1:50 PM Hines, Mark T.*: SHALLOW GEOPHYSICS AND ITS 5-4 11 Graham, Jennifer*: INVESTIGATION INTO THE TIMING OF BENEFITS ON THE DELINEATION OF IN SITU URANIUM DOWNCUTTING, DOUGLAS CREEK ARROYO, RANGELY, RIO MINING; PRELIMINARY STUDIES BLANCO COUNTY, COLORADO 5-5 12 Rice-Snow, Scott*: INDEPENDENCE OF CONTINENTAL DIVIDE SESSION NO. 7 TRACE COMPLEXITY FROM TOPOGRAPHIC RELIEF Keynote Address: A Career of Yellowstone Research and Discoveries SESSION NO. 6 6:00 PM, Best Western Ramkota Hotel, South Ballroom T12. Applications for GIS and Geospatial Data in the Geosciences Kent Sundell, Presiding (Posters) 7-1 6:00 PM Smith, Robert B.*: A CAREER OF YELLOWSTONE 12:00 PM, Best Western Ramkota Hotel, North/Central Ballroom RESEARCH AND DISCOVERIES Authors will be present from 4 to 6 PM Booth # 6-1 13 Nelsen, McKay*; Toke, Nathan A.; Fellows, Steven A.; Jackson, POSTER Joshua W.: GIS ANALYSIS OF THE TYPES AND SPATIAL EXTENTS OF VOLCANIC HAZARDS IN MILLARD COUNTY, UTAH TECHNICAL SESSIONS 6-2 14 Hein, Lewis*: FIELD SITE LOCATOR APPLICATION USING CROSS PLATFORM, OPEN SOURCE GIS SESSION NO. 4 6-3 15 Trumbo, Adam L.*; Feil, Michael J.; Klaiber, Christian; Johnson, Verner C.: STRUCTURAL AND CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF S1. Yellowstone/Teton/Snake River Plain VolcanoTectonic System: CATACLASTIC MINERAL OCCURRENCES IN THE EASTERN Honoring 55 Years of Distinguished Research and the Legacy of PORTION OF UNAWEEP CANYON, CO Bob Smith (Posters) 6-4 16 Biel, Alyssa*; Emanuel, Karl: PRELIMINARY GIS EVALUATION OF 12:00 PM, Best Western Ramkota Hotel, North/Central Ballroom GROUND MOVEMENT AT COOK LAKE, WYOMING Authors will be present from 4 to 6 PM Booth # 4-1 1 Kobayashi, Daisuke*; Sprenke, Kenneth F.: STATIC STRESS TRANSFER FROM HISTORICAL AND HYPOTHETICAL FRIDAY, 22 MAY 2015 EARTHQUAKES IN NORTHERN ROCKIES TO THE YELLOWSTONE VOLCANIC SYSTEM 4-2 2 Mencin, David*; Luttrell, Karen; Hodgkinson, Kathleen; Francis, Olivier; Hurwitz, Shaul: SEICHES IN LAKE YELLOWSTONE: A MORNING GEOPHYSICAL TOOL ORAL TECHNICAL SESSIONS 4-3 3 Parker, Stuart D.*: DEFORMED RIVER GRAVEL OF THE SOUTHERN BEAVERHEAD MOUNTAINS; NEOTECTONIC IMPLICATIONS SESSION NO. 8 4-4 4 Lochridge, William*; McCurry, Michael: PRELIMINARY TEXTURAL S1. Yellowstone/Teton/Snake River Plain VolcanoTectonic System: CHARACTERIZATION OF PHENOCRYSTS IN 57 KA TOPAZ Honoring 55 Years of Distinguished Research and the Legacy of RHYOLITE LAVA DOMES IN THE BLACKFOOT VOLCANIC FIELD, Bob Smith SE IDAHO 8:00 AM, Best Western Ramkota Hotel, Wyoming Theater 4-5 5 McCurry, Michael*; Pearson, David M.; Welhan, John: REGIONAL Jamie Farrell and Henry Heasler, Presiding INTERACTIONS AMONG CRUSTAL TECTONICS, STRUCTURES 8:00 AM Introductory Remarks AND MAGMA TRANSFER ASSOCIATED WITH THE QUATERNARY BLACKFOOT VOLCANIC FIELD, SE IDAHO 8-1 8:05 AM Lounsbury, John*: A RANGERS PERSPECTIVE ON GEOPHYSICAL EXPERIMENTS IN YELLOWSTONE 4-6 6 Goldsby, Ryan C.*; McCurry, Michael; Lochridge, William: NATIONAL PARK: MY TIME IN THE BACKCOUNTRY WITH PRELIMINARY CHARACTERIZATION OF MAFIC MAGMATIC BOB SMITH ENCLAVES IN 57KA TOPAZ RHYOLITE LAVA DOMES IN THE BLACKFOOT VOLCANIC FIELD, SE IDAHO 8-2 8:25 AM Christiansen, Robert L.*: UNDERSTANDING THE YELLOWSTONE CALDERA AND ITS VOLCANIC SYSTEM 4-7 7 Moore, Dan K.; Embree, Glenn; Champion, Duane E.; Kuntz, Mel A.; George, Alex*; Leishman, Blair M.: ORIGIN OF LAVA BENCHES 8-3 8:45 AM Susong, David*; Heasler, Hank P.; Gardner, W. Payton; AND UPPER AND LOWER MESA FALLS IN THE HENRYS FORK Solomon, D. Kip: OBSERVATIONS FROM STREAMS AND AND WARM RIVER CANYONS, ISLAND PARK, IDAHO SPRINGS PROVIDE INSIGHT INTO GROUNDWATER IN YELLOWSTONE SESSION NO. 5 8-4 9:05 AM Puskas, C.M.*; Meertens, Charles M.; Chang, W.L.; Farrell, T2. Geomorphology and Surficial Processes (Posters) Jamie; Smith, Robert B.: A HISTORY OF GEODESY IN YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK AND THE LEGACY OF 12:00 PM, Best Western Ramkota Hotel, North/Central Ballroom ROBERT B. SMITH Authors will be present from 4 to 6 PM 8-5 9:25 AM Lowenstern, Jacob B.*; Hurwitz, Shaul: WHATS GOING Booth # ON BENEATH YELLOWSTONE? A GEOCHEMICAL 5-1 8 Kenny, Ray*: CLIMATIC PALEOTEMPERATURES FROM OXYGEN PERSPECTIVE AND HYDROGEN ISOTOPES IN CHERT, AND PETROGRAPHY 8-6 9:45 AM Jaworowski, Cheryl*; Heasler, Henry; Susong, David: OF THE NEOPROTEROZOIC SIXTYMILE FORMATION: GRAND PRELIMINARY STRATIGRAPHIC INTEREPRETATION FROM CANYON NATIONAL PARK, AZ 26 2015 GSA Abstracts with Programs

15 SESSION NO. 12 BOREHOLE STRAINMETER DRLLING, YELLOWSTONE 10-2 10:25 AM Hu, Xiaoni*; Heller, Paul L.; Jones, Nick: ESTIMATING TIMING NATIONAL PARK AND MAGNITUDE OF SURFACE UPLIFT IN THE GREATER 10:05 AM Break BIGHORN MOUNTAINS AREA, WYOMING, USING BASIN SUBSIDENCE MODELING 8-7 10:20 AM Farrell, Jamie*; Smith, Robert B.; Huang, Hsin-Hua; Lin, Fan-Chi; Chang, Wu-Lung; Puskas, Christine M.: RECENT 10-3 10:45 AM Rhodes, Rebekah*; McElroy, Brandon; Campbell-Stone, DISCOVERIES OF YELLOWSTONES MAGMATIC Erin: LINKING THE SURFACE TO THE SUBSURFACE: PLUMBING SYSTEM, SEISMIC SWARMS AND THEIR ENVIRONMENTAL VARIABILITY OF THE FRONTIER RELATIONSHIP TO CURRENT DEFORMATION FORMATION, POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING, USA 8-8 10:40 AM Fournier, Robert O.*: AN EXPLANATION FOR HOW 10-4 11:05 AM Pearson, David M.*; Becker, Thomas P.: PROTEROZOIC RIFT AN APPARENT LONG STOPPAGE IN HOT SPRING SYSTEMS AND THEIR INFLUENCE ON THE FORMATION AND GEYSER ACTIVITY AT UPPER GEYSER BASIN, OF THE LATE CRETACEOUS-EARLY CENOZOIC WYOMING YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK MAY HAVE COME SALIENT ABOUT 10-5 11:25 AM Song, Ying*; Stepashko, Andrei; Ren, Jianye; Qi, Ying: THE 8-9 11:00 AM Heasler, Henry P.*; Jaworowski, Cheryl: USING AIRBORNE LATE CRETACEOUS MAJOR REORGANIZATION EVENT THERMAL INFRARED REMOTE SENSING FOR OF PACIFIC PLATE, AGE 87-89 MA (LATE TURONIAN/ HYDROTHERMAL MONITORING OF NORRIS GEYSER CONIACIAN): INSIGHT FROM EASTERN ASIA AND BASIN IMPLICATION TO THE LARAMIDE OROGENY IN WESTERN INTERIOR IN NORTH AMERICA 8-10 11:20 AM Willis, Julie B.*; Ramos, Sara; Colwell, Christopher L.; Hanson, Jared J.: LIDAR MAPPING OF LANDSLIDES AND SECONDARY FAULT SCARPS, TETON RANGE, WYOMING 8-11 11:40 AM Sears, James W.*: PLIOCENE TRUNCATION OF A MAJOR POSTER NORTH-FLOWING RIVER SYSTEM BY THE YELLOWSTONE HOTSPOT TRACK NEAR MONIDA PASS, IDAHO/MONTANA TECHNICAL SESSIONS SESSION NO. 9 SESSION NO. 11 T3. Advancements and Issues in Petroleum Extraction Technologies Economic Geology, Geochemistry, and Energy (Posters) (Wyoming Geological Association in conjunction with the Enhanced 8:00 AM, Best Western Ramkota Hotel, North/Central Ballroom Oil Recovery Institute) Authors will be present from 3:45 to 5:45 PM 8:00 AM, Best Western Ramkota Hotel, South Ballroom Booth # Mike Bingle-Davis, Presiding 11-1 1 Doolittle, Margaret F.*: NATURALLY OCCURRING ACID ROCK 8:00 AM Introductory Remarks DRAINAGE IN THE ANACONDA-PINTLER MOUNTAIN RANGE, MONTANA: PRELIMINARY GEOCHEMISTRY OF TWO STREAMS 9-1 8:05 AM Bingle-Davis, Marron*; Jones, Nick: HISTORIC AND RECENT FLOWING FROM MT. EVANS DEVELOPMENTS AT OSAGE FIELD, WESTON COUNTY, WYOMING 11-3 3 Kester, Mackenzie N.*: THE EFFECTS OF GLACIAL ADVANCE ON THE CREATION OF ORE BEARING FLUIDS 9-2 8:25 AM Rausch Lemaster, Julia C.*: A REVIEW OF THE LITHOFACIES AND DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENTS OF 11-4 4 Edinberg, Sara C.*; Gammons, Christopher H.: NATURAL ACID THE MUDDY/NEWCASTLE SANDSTONE IN THE EASTERN ROCK DRAINAGE CHEMISTRY AND FERRICRETE DEPOSITS POWDER RIVER BASIN OF WYOMING OF THE JUDITH MOUNTAINS, MONTANA 9-3 8:45 AM Chopping, Curtis G.*; Jones, Nick; Yin, Peigui: METHODS 11-5 5 Oster, Benjamin S.*; Ostadhassan, Mehdi: WINNIPEGOSIS USED TO CONDUCT A SEMI-QUANTITATIVE CLAY FORMATION, PLATFORM MARGIN: RESERVOIR ANALYSIS OF A CLAY-RICH CRETACEOUS OIL CHARACTERIZATION RESERVOIR 9-4 9:05 AM Bratcher, Jordan C.*; Herz-Thyhsen, Ryan J.; Kaszuba, John: SESSION NO. 12 EFFECT OF IONIC STRENGTH ON GEOCHEMICAL WATER- T4. Mineralogy, Petrology, and Mining (Posters) ROCK INTERACTIONS DURING HYDRAULIC FRACTURING 8:00 AM, Best Western Ramkota Hotel, North/Central Ballroom IN THE FRONTIER FORMATION OF THE POWDER RIVER Authors will be present from 3:45 to 5:45 PM BASIN, WYOMING Booth # 9-5 9:25 AM Adams, Joshua G.*; Gonzales, David A.: APPLICATION 12-1 6 Gesualdo, Anthony M.*; Baran, Zeynep O.; Lisenbee, OF AR-HE-NE ISOTOPES AT MCELMO DOME-DOE AlvisL.; Paterson, Colin J.: STRUCTURAL CONTROLS ON CANYON TO INVESTIGATE CO2 SOURCE AND SYSTEM MINERALIZATION AT MARIGOLD MINE, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CHARACTERIZATION NV: A DETAILED STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF THE TERRY ZONE 9:45 AM Concluding Remarks COMPLEX 12-2 7 Zimmerman, Jarred L.*; Gammons, Christopher H.; Korzeb, Stanley: SESSION NO. 10 FLUID INCLUSION AND PETROGRAPHIC ANALYSIS OF THE T9. Mountain Building and Basin Response: New Insights to the EMERY MINING DISTRICT, SOUTHWEST MONTANA Bighorn Mountains and Associated Basins 12-3 8 Kanters, Christopher*; Friberg, LaVerne: DELINEATING GOLD AND 10:00 AM, Best Western Ramkota Hotel, South Ballroom SILVER DISTRIBUTION IN FELDSPAR, CARBONATE, BASTITE, Ranie Lynds, Erin Campbell-Stone, and Eric Erslev, Presiding AND VEINS OF HYDROTHERMALLY ALTERED ROCKS FROM THE HELEN ZONE IN THE COVE DEPOSIT, LANDER COUNTY, 10:00 AM Introductory Remarks NEVADA 10-1 10:05 AM Erslev, Eric A.*; Worthington, Lindsay Lowe; Aydinian, Karen; 12-4 9 Allaz, Julien M.; Pritekel, Cameron*; Condit, Cailey B.; Rattanasith, Miller, Kate C.; Sheehan, A.; Yeck, William; ORourke, Colin; Diana; Mahan, Kevin H.; Kelly, Nigel M.; Baird, Graham B.: Siddoway, Christine S.; Anderson, Megan; Harder, Steve: INVESTIGATING THE P-T CONDITIONS AND TEMPORAL BASEMENT-INVOLVED LARAMIDE THRUSTING AND CONSTRAINTS ON REGIONAL METAMORPHISM NEAR BIG LOWER-CRUSTAL DETACHMENT IN THE ROCKIES: THOMPSON CANYON, COLORADO, USA RESULTS FROM THE NSF/EARTHSCOPE BIGHORN PROJECT 2015 GSA Rocky Mountain Section Meeting 27

16 SESSION NO. 12 12-5 10 Cordry, Seth Valentine*; Allard, Stephen T.: CHARACTERIZING 14-3 1:45 PM Kyle, J. Richard*: APPLICATION OF HIGH RESOLUTION OXIDE AND SULFIDE MINERALIZATION IN THE NEMO SHEAR X-RAY COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IN ECONOMIC ZONE, SD GEOLOGY 14-4 2:05 PM Spencer, Nathan*; Gonzales, David A.; Harraden, CassadyL.: SESSION NO. 13 TESTING MODELS ON THE RELATIONSHIP OF CLAY T7. Paleontology, Paleoclimate, Paleoecology, and Evolution ALTERATION AND MINERALIZATION: BULLDOG (Posters) MOUNTAIN VEIN SYSTEM, CREEDE, COLORADO 8:00 AM, Best Western Ramkota Hotel, North/Central Ballroom 2:25 PM Break Authors will be present from 3:45 to 5:45 PM 14-5 2:40 PM Anderson, Jacob L.*: PREDICTING CONTEMPORANEOUS Booth # SAND BODIES FOR MINE DEWATERING IN THE FORT 13-1 11 Ishler, Scott A.*; Harries, Peter J.; Slattery, Joshua S.; Crdenas, UNION FORMATION OF THE POWDER RIVER BASIN, Andrs L.: FRESHWATER VARIABILITY ALONG THE WESTERN WYOMING SHORELINE OF THE MAASTRICHTIAN WESTERN INTERIOR 14-6 3:00 PM Bingle-Davis, Michael*: COMPUTER BASED FACIES SEAWAY SIMULATIONS IN OREBODIES: BENEFITS, DRAWBACKS 13-2 12 Connely, Melissa V.*: PTEROSAUR SWIMMING TRACKS: A CASE AND PRACTICAL EXAMPLES FOR BUOYANCY 14-7 3:20 PM Loope, David B.*; Kettler, Richard M.: ORIGINS OF THICK 13-3 13 Wiltshire, Laura*; Ruga, Mikaela; Tan, Mengxi; Schmidt, David: ACCUMULATIONS OF IRON-OXIDE CEMENT ALONG A NEW FOSSIL VERTEBRATE MICROSITE FROM THE HELL JOINTS IN THE NAVAJO SANDSTONE, SOUTHERN UTAH CREEK FORMATION, SOUTH DAKOTA 14-8 3:40 PM Lines, Rick*; Huffaker, Bret; McNeff, Joshua; Slater, Kevin; 13-4 14 Haupt, Ryan J.*; Vietti, Laura A.; Kerr, Tyler J.; Clementz, MarkT.: Emerman, Steven H.; Fellows, Steven A.: NUMERICAL OVERVIEW AND SIGNIFICANCE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF SIMULATION OF TRANSPORT OF MINE TAILINGS IN THE WYOMING PALEOZOIC AND MESOZOIC VERTEBRATE AND WATERSHED OF UTAH LAKE, UTAH INVERTEBRATE FOSSIL COLLECTIONS 4:00 PM Concluding Remarks 13-5 15 Kerr, Tyler J.*; Vietti, Laura A.; Haupt, Ryan J.; Clementz, MarkT.: OVERVIEW AND SIGNIFICANCE OF THE UNIVERISTY OF SESSION NO. 15 WYOMING CENOZOIC VERTEBRATE FOSSIL COLLECTION T7. Paleontology, Paleoclimate, Paleoecology, and Evolution 13-6 16 Weaver, Lucas N.*: EARLY EOCENE PRIMATE DISTRIBUTION 1:00 PM, Best Western Ramkota Hotel, South Ballroom IN RELATION TO PALEOSOL MATURITY: IMPLICATIONS J.P. Cavigelli, Melissa V. Connely, and Stephen T. Hasiotis, Presiding FOR DETERMINING MICROHABITAT PREFERENCES USING GEOLOGIC PROXIES 1:00 PM Introductory Remarks 13-7 17 Clark, Natalia M.*; Nichols, Kimberly A.; Weaver, Lucas N.; Bown, 15-1 1:05 PM Ward, Peter L.*: CLIMATE THROUGHOUT GEOLOGIC TIME Thomas M.: DENTAL-BASED BODY MASS ESTIMATION IN HAS BEEN CONTROLLED PRIMARILY BY THE BALANCE EARLY EOCENE PRIMATES AND PLESIADAPIFORMES; BETWEEN COOLING CAUSED BY MAJOR EXPLOSIVE WILLWOOD FORMATION, BIGHORN BASIN, WYOMING ERUPTIONS OF EVOLVED MAGMAS TYPICAL OF ISLAND ARCS AND WARMING CAUSED BY VOLUMINOUS 13-8 18 Bown, Thomas M.*; Nichols, Kimberly A.; Weaver, Lucas N.; Clark, EFFUSIVE ERUPTIONS OF BASALTIC MAGMA TYPICAL Natalia M.; Stucky, Richard K.: ROLE OF LOWERED BASELEVELS OF SUBAERIAL OCEAN RIDGES, ISLAND CHAINS, AND IN THE GENERATION OF EARLY EOCENE BIOHORIZONS; CONTINENTAL FLOOD BASALTS WILLWOOD FORMATION, SOUTHERN BIGHORN BASIN, WYOMING 15-2 1:25 PM Awad, Walaa K.*; Oboh-Ikuenobe, Francisca E.: PALEOENVIRONMENTAL SIGNIFICANCE OF 13-9 19 Nichols, Kimberly A.*; Bown, Thomas M.; Clark, Natalia M.; Weaver, APECTODINIUM IN THE LATE PALEOCENE OF WEST Lucas N.: NEW PARTIALLY ARTICULATED SKELETON OF AFRICA PALAEANODON, (MAMMALIA: PALAEANODONTA) FROM THE WILLWOOD FORMATION (LOWER EOCENE), BIGHORN BASIN, 15-3 1:45 PM Jijina, Anthony*: THE EARLY PALEOGENE HERREN FLORA: WYOMING AN INVESTIGATION INTO THE EARLY CENOZOIC HISTORY OF THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST 13-10 20 Dahlberg, Elisa*; Eberle, Jaelyn J.; Sertich, Joe: A NEW EARLIEST PALEOCENE (PUERCAN) FAUNA FROM COLORADOS 15-4 2:05 PM Lis, Richard*: LEAF ARCHITECTURAL ANALYSIS OF DENVERBASIN EXTANT AND EXTINCT SPECIES OF HOLODISCUS (ROSACEAE) A GENUS WITH ORIGINS IN THE TERTIARY OF WESTERN NORTH AMERICA 2:25 PM Break AFTERNOON 15-5 2:40 PM Leger, Ashley M.*; Agenbroad, Larry D.; Price, Maribeth H.: ORAL TECHNICAL SESSIONS DOCUMENTING POSSIBILITIES OF REGIONAL VARIATION IN THE COLUMBIAN MAMMOTH (MAMMUTHUS COLUMBI) USING MORPHOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF CRANIAL AND SESSION NO. 14 DENTAL METRICS FROM SPECIMENS ACROSS THE T4. Mineralogy, Petrology, and Mining UNITED STATES 1:00 PM, Best Western Ramkota Hotel, Wyoming Theater 15-6 3:00 PM Driscoll, Daniel*; Dunhill, Alexander; Benton, Michael J.: Phil Nickerson and Heather Lawson, Presiding FOSSIL COMPLETENESS OF THE THALATTOSUCHIA 1:00 PM Introductory Remarks 15-7 3:20 PM Slattery, Joshua S.*; Andres, Brian; Sandness, Ashley L.; Harries, Peter J.: THE PHYLOGENY AND EVOLUTION OF 14-1 1:05 PM Stevenson, Ryan; Gammons, Christopher H.*: STABLE THE HETEROMORPHIC AMMONITE BACULITES IN THE ISOTOPES OF HYDROTHERMAL CARBONATE MINERALS LATE CRETACEOUS WESTERN INTERIOR SEAWAY IN THE BUTTE PORPHYRY-LODE DEPOSITS, MONTANA 3:40 PM Concluding Remarks 14-2 1:25 PM Howell, Brock*; Nelsen, McKay; Christiansen, Norman; Emerman, Steven H.; Fellows, Steven A.: GEOCHEMICAL SURVEY OF THE SEVIER RIVER FOR ASSESSING THE GOLD- AND URANIUM-BEARING POTENTIAL OF THE MOUNT BELKNAP VOLCANICS, SOUTH-CENTRAL UTAH 28 2015 GSA Abstracts with Programs

17 SESSION NO. 19 17-5 9:25 AM Calzia, J.P.*; Rm, O. Tapani; Andersen, T.H.; Troxel, Bennie: SATURDAY, 23 MAY 2015 DIABASE VS DETRITAL ZIRCONS: THE AGE OF THE CRYSTAL SPRING FORMATION, SOUTHERN DEATH VALLEY, CA 9:45 AM Concluding Remarks MORNING SESSION NO. 18 ORAL TECHNICAL SESSIONS T10. Geoscience Education and Undergraduate Research 10:00 AM, Best Western Ramkota Hotel, Wyoming Theater SESSION NO. 16 Suzanne M. Smaglik and Kimberly A. Hannula, Presiding S2. The Continental Triassic: Sedimentary and Paleobiologic 10:00 AM Introductory Remarks Records throughout the Rocky Mountain Region 18-1 10:05 AM Lippincott, Jessica L.*: CSI: JURASSIC; DINOSAUR 8:00 AM, Best Western Ramkota Hotel, South Ballroom ACADEMY David M. Lovelace, Michelle R. Stocker, and Scott Hartman, Presiding 18-2 10:25 AM Rempe, Norbert T.*: GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES AND 8:00 AM Introductory Remarks RADIOACTIVITY: CONSEQUENCES FOR EARTH SCIENCE 16-1 8:10 AM Thomson, Tracy J.*: THE HIDDEN BIODIVERSITY AND EDUCATION ECOLOGY OF EARLY TRIASSIC ORGANISMS REVEALED 18-3 10:45 AM Dwyer, Nora J.*; Gonzales, David A.: NEW INSIGHT INTO BY TRACE FOSSILS FROM THE MOENKOPI FORMATION THE HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO BASIN STOCK FROM OF CENTRAL UTAH U/PB ZIRCON AGE CONSTRAINTS, NEEDLE MOUNTAINS, 16-2 8:30 AM Lovelace, David M.*; Stocker, Michelle R.: PALEONTOLOGY, SOUTHWESTERN COLORADO PALEOECOLOGY, AND STRATIGRAPHY OF THE MIDDLE 18-4 11:05 AM Lewis, Kyle A.*; Gonzales, David A.: RESOLUTION OF PORTION OF THE CHUGWATER GROUP, CENTRAL CONTROVERSY OVER THE TIMING OF EMPLACEMENT OF WYOMING THE MT. SNEFFELS-STONY MOUNTAIN STOCK, WESTERN 16-3 8:50 AM Loope, David B.*; Kettler, Richard M.: ENVIRONMENTAL SAN JUAN MOUNTAINS, COLORADO IMPLICATIONS OF EARLY DIAGENETIC SIDERITE IN THE 18-5 11:25 AM Rafferty, Kevin*: STRATIGRAPHY OF MIDDLE CENOZOIC SHINARUMP MEMBER OF THE CHINLE FORMATION, STRATA NEAR HATCH, UTAH CHOCOLATE CLIFFS, UTAH AND ARIZONA 11:45 AM Concluding Remarks 9:10 AM Break 16-4 9:30 AM Habib, Margaret M.*; Kim, Soo Hyun; Lovelace, DavidM.; Hotchkiss, Sara C.: PRELIMINARY RESULTS OF PALYNOLOGICAL STUDIES OF THE CHUGWATER GROUP POSTER (TRIASSIC), WYOMING TECHNICAL SESSIONS 16-5 9:50 AM Hartman, Scott; Lovelace, David M.*; Stocker, Michelle R.: STRATIGRAPHIC AND CHRONOLOGIC RELATIONSHIPS SESSION NO. 19 OF THE POPO AGIE FORMATION, UPPER CHUGWATER GROUP Structural Geology, Tectonics, and Tectonophysics (Posters) 16-6 10:10 AM Irmis, Randall B.*; Chure, Daniel J.; Engelmann, GeorgeF.; 8:00 AM, Best Western Ramkota Hotel, North/Central Ballroom Lindstrm, Sofie; Wiersma, Jelle P.: UPPER TRIASSIC Authors will be present from 10 AM to 12 PM STRATA OF THE SOUTHERN UINTA MOUNTAINS, Booth # NORTHEASTERN UTAH: A LINK BETWEEN SEDIMENTARY 19-1 1 Gomez-Hurtado, Eliana*; Marin-Marin, Juan Sebastian: PALEO- RECORDS OF THE COLORADO PLATEAU AND WYOMING STRESSES ANALYSIS, BY MEANS OF STRIATED FAILURES IN 16-7 10:30 AM Kowallis, Bart J.*; May, Skyler B.; Sprinkel, Douglas A.; Jensen, CHINCHINA-SANTA ROSA STOCK Paul H.; Morris, Thomas H.; Britt, Brooks B.: MAPPING THE 19-2 2 Song, Ying*; Ren, Jianye; Stepashko, Andrei: DEFORMATION UPPER TRIASSIC BELL SPRINGS FORMATION ALONG HISTORY OF THE SONGLIAO BASIN IN CONTEXT OF LATE THE SOUTH FLANK OF THE UINTA MOUNTAINS, UTAH CRETACEOUS- PALEOGENE (SYN-LARAMIDE OROGENY 10:50 AM Concluding Remarks PERIOD) TECTONICS OF THE NORTHEAST ASIA: INSIGHT FROM REGIONAL ANGULAR UNCONFORMITIES AND LOW SESSION NO. 17 TEMPERATURE THERMOCHRONOLOGY T1. In Celebration of the Release of the WGA 2014 Wyoming 19-3 3 Timbel, Carter B.*: UNCOMPAHGRE THRUST GEOMETRY: Stratigraphic Nomenclature Chart: Topics in Rocky Mountain A SEISMIC, FIELD AND GRAVITY STUDY NEAR NUCLA, Stratigraphy and Sedimentology COLORADO, PARADOX BASIN, USA 8:00 AM, Best Western Ramkota Hotel, Wyoming Theater 19-4 4 Martnez-Sacristn, Hernando*; Mendoza-Alzate, Lucney: SOME SYNCLINE STRUCTURES ARE LARGE, ELONGATED, Marron Bingle-Davis, Presiding AND RAISED IN CUNDINAMARCA, COLOMBIA: FAR FROM 8:00 AM Introductory Remarks RHETORIC, CLOSER TO REALITY 17-1 8:05 AM George, Lyn*; Cardinal, Don; Babb, Carl; Winter, Gary: 2014 19-5 5 Tenney, McKay*; Clayton, Robert: A 3-D EARTH MODEL OF MT. WYOMING STRATIGRAPHIC NOMENCLATURE CHART TIMPANOGOS, WASATCH RANGE, UTAH 17-2 8:25 AM Raynolds, Robert G.*; Hagadorn, James W.: COLORADOS 19-6 6 Clayton, Spencer R.*; Clayton, Robert W.: A 3-D EARTH MODEL OF STRATIGRAPHY RE-CHARTED, REVEALS PATTERNS STACKED THRUSTS IN THE SEVIER THRUST BELT, BIG HOLE 17-3 8:45 AM Clement, Annaka M.*; Holland, Steven M.; Graybeal, Daniel: MOUNTAINS, EASTERN IDAHO THE SEQUENCE STRATIGRAPHIC ARCHITECTURE OF 19-7 7 West, Jenna M.*; Hudson, Mark R.; Cole, James C.; Dechesne, THE MIDDLE JURASSIC GYPSUM SPRING AND PIPER Marieke: PALEOMAGNETISM SURVEY OF THE NORTH PARK FORMATIONS IN THE EASTERN BIGHORN BASIN OF SYNCLINE (NORTHERN COLORADO): EVALUATION OF TIMING WYOMING OF VOLCANISM AND FOLDING 17-4 9:05 AM Fraser, Allan B.*: NEW MAJOR DISPERSED SOURCE OF 19-8 8 Curtis, Daniel J.*; Evans, James P.; Petrie, Elizabeth S.: FLUID SWEETWATER AGATES MIGRATION IN FAULTS: ANALYSIS OF THE HITE FAULT GROUP 2015 GSA Rocky Mountain Section Meeting 29

18 SESSION NO. 19 19-9 9 Hansen, Connor M.*; Pearson, David M.; Link, Paul K.: THE ROLE SESSION NO. 21 OF PRE-EXISTING STRUCTURES ON THE GEOMETRY OF THE T10. Geoscience Education and Undergraduate Research (Posters) LATE CRETACEOUS POISON CREEK THRUST FAULT OF EAST- CENTRAL IDAHO 8:00 AM, Best Western Ramkota Hotel, North/Central Ballroom 19-10 10 Parker, Grace E.*; Chamberlain, Kevin; Siddoway, Christine: THE Authors will be present from 8 to 10 AM POWDER RIVER PASS SHEAR ZONE - ROOTS OF AN ARCHEAN Booth # FORELAND THRUST FAULT? 21-1 18 Kruger, Felicia J.*: IMPLEMENTING A GEOLOGIC HAZARD UNIT 19-11 11 Brenner, Kelly A.*; Orlandini, Omero F.; Mahan, Kevin H.; IN TO ENTRY LEVEL GEOLOGY CLASSES Allaz, Julien; Williams, Michael L.: MICROSTRUCTURAL AND 21-2 19 Girts, Jeffrey A.*; Hannula, Kimberly A.: MAPPING AND 3D MODEL PETROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS OF MULTIPLE GENERATIONS RESTORATION OF FAULTS BORDERING THE SILVERTON AND OF DEEP CRUSTAL SEISMIC SLIP SAN JUAN CALDERAS, SAN JUAN MOUNTAINS, COLORADO 19-12 12 Duncan, Joel G.*: SHATTER CONES IN THE FRONT RANGE: 21-3 20 Barney, Bryce B.*; Jernigan, A.J.; Moore, Dan K.; Embree, GlennF.; EVIDENCE FOR MULTIPLE IMPACTS Doherty, David: HEISE CLIFFS VOLCANICS: A PRELIMINARY GEOLOGIC MAP OF THE HEISE CLIFFS AREA, ID SESSION NO. 20 21-4 21 Holden, Sara C.*; Gonzales, David A.: GEOCHRONOLOGIC T1. In Celebration of the Release of the WGA 2014 Wyoming EVIDENCE FOR THE TIMING OF PRECIOUS METALS Stratigraphic Nomenclature Chart: Topics in Rocky Mountain MINERALIZATION IN THE BESSIE G MINE, LA PLATA Stratigraphy and Sedimentology (Posters) MOUNTAINS, COLORADO 8:00 AM, Best Western Ramkota Hotel, North/Central Ballroom 21-5 22 Provow, Ashley W.*; Boyter, Brady; Hartman, Joseph H.; Eaton, Authors will be present from 10 AM to 12 PM Jeffery G.; Rafferty, Kevin: PETROLOGY OF EOCENE ROCKS OF Booth # ANTIMONY AND DRY CANYONS, SOUTHWESTERN UTAH 20-1 13 Dechesne, Marieke*; Cole, James C.; Trexler, James H. Jr..; 21-6 23 Fussell, Shane S.*; Mueller, Paul A.; Mogk, David W.: AGE AND Cashman, Patricia H.; West, Jenna M.: PALEOCENE EOCENE ORIGIN OF THE BRIDGER GNEISSES: IMPLICATIONS FOR STRATA REVEAL COMPLEX BASIN EVOLUTION OF THE NORTH PROVENANCE OF THE LAHOOD FORMATION PARK-MIDDLE PARK BASIN, COLORADO 21-7 24 Guerrero, Juan Carlos*; Mueller, Paul A.; Mogk, David W.: 20-2 14 Schmidt, Jon*; Clayton, Robert: A 3-D EARTH MODEL OF THE GEOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS AND PROVENANCE OF THE FALL CREEK AREA, SEVIER THRUST BELT, EASTERN IDAHO LAHOOD FORMATION OF THE BRIDGER RANGE, MONTANA 20-3 15 Allred, Isaac*; Hudson, Sam: FLUVIAL ARCHITECTURE AND 21-8 25 Reeter, Derek Kraemer*; Nauer, Catherine Elaine; Dewey, Janet; FACIES DISTRIBUTION OF THE CUTLER FORMATION WITHIN Riebe, Clifford S.: LABORATORY STUDY OF THE INFLUENCE OF FISHER MINI-BASIN, PARADOX BASIN, UTAH: RESERVOIR FLUID RESIDENCE TIME ON GRANITE WEATHERING RATES MODELING OF A SALT-INFLUENCED, SOURCE-PROXIMAL 21-9 26 Newman, Dustin R.*; Smaglik, Suzanne M.: GROUND- FLUVIAL SYSTEM USING DIGITAL OUTCROP TECHNIQUES PENETRATING RADAR STUDY ON TABLE MOUNTAIN, 20-4 16 Davis, Colter R.*; Kehoe, Kenneth K.: SEQUENCE STRATIGRAPHY, FREMONT CO., WYOMING CHEMOSTRATIGRAPHY, AND BIOSTRATIGRAPHY OF LOWER 21-10 27 Anderson, P.I.*; Kenny, Ray: OSL DATING OF FLUVIAL AND ORDOVICIAN UNITS IN NORTHEASTERN AND WESTERN LACUSTRINE SEDIMENT NORTH OF DURANGO, COLORADO: CENTRAL UTAH: REGIONAL IMPLICATIONS A RECORD OF AN ASYNCHRONOUS GLACIAL ADVANCE AT 20-5 17 Hagadorn, James W.*; Raynolds, Robert G.; Bender, April; Hill, 55KA? Teresa: COLORADOS STRATIGRAPHY RE-CHARTED, DIGITAL 21-11 28 Passehl, Candice D.*; Kenny, Ray: LUMINESCENCE ACCESS TO STATES STRATA AND EVOLVING LANDSCAPES CHRONOLOGY OF A POST-BULL LAKE GLACIAL DEPOSIT IN THE SOUTHERN SAN JUAN MOUNTAINS: IMPLICATIONS FOR REVISITING THE GLACIAL STRATIGRAPHY IN THE DURANGO, COLORADO AREA 30 2015 GSA Abstracts with Programs

19 U p o n Provis o c k i on St s Coming Soon! ook, on e H andb h Editi der n c ft g Fol G e oscie heets, Fi S izin The a S rain AGI Dat ze Sand G e Scale et-Si im Scale le / T Pock Photo Sca gic Time lo GSA t-Size Geo CTS 712" W al le N P RODU 7 " x - R A I k , 4 8 x 5" HE Boo IT E -IN-T d Bound b oo k, 3" R Fiel Not e logy iral k Geo Pocket Sp ic Noteboo h i r t e t r S l M Spira lster Side ra Pen Ho du ns Cor eather Pe Rells -W e n 5" All eather P 31 " x - W ch k , 2 All Book Pou Memo Boo d Fiel Field-Flex k Blac SHOP ONLINE } http: http:////rock.geosociety.org/store/ /rock.geosociety.org/store/ toll-free 1.888.443.4472 | +1.303.357.1000, option 3 | [email protected]

20 The 2015 GSA Annual Meeting will take place in vibrant Baltimore, Maryland, USA. Commonly known as Charm City, this ever-evolving, walkable city is steeped in history. In 1814, Baltimores bombardment by the British inspired Francis Scott Key to write the lyrics for The Star-Spangled Banner. Visit the Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine to learn more about the War of 1812, explore Baltimores world-famous Inner Harbor, and enjoy the flavor of the citys quirky and distinct neighborhoods. Baltimores location and geology will make for some unique field trips. We hope you will join us 14 November to explore this areas geologic offerings and to forge connections with other geoscientists. Abstract deadline: 11 August c ommuni t y.ge oso cie t y.or g /gs a2 015 Photos courtesy of Visit Baltimore.

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